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OAU EGL 101 Past Questions And Answers | OAU English Department

OAU EGL 101 Past Questions And Answers | OAU English Department. DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

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OAU EGL 101 PRACTICE EXERCISE 2016 CLASS

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INSTRUCTIONS:

Read the following passages from On the Bank of the River and answer the questions after each of them: Click Here To Download The PDF useful for Offline users. OAU EGL 101 Past Questions And Answers By Akahi Tutors

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Passage A

Ever since I could discern the difference between good and bad, right and wrong, I always wanted to find answers to questions about myself. Every child grew into answers of their birth, infancy and childhood as years go by. The more I grew up, the more complicated my questions became, and yet unanswered. I had a hardworking mother, but answers to the questions about my father had remained a mystery. My mother, who I mostly called Ma, had no other relations that I knew about, except a woman so different from her, a woman who shared the same passage of existence with her: my aunt. My aunt did not stay with us in our little village because she worked in the city, a place called Lagos. She worked as a journalist for a popular newspaper. She visited frequently when I was a child, but her visits thinned out with time. Her visit was always something to look forward to.

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Auntie, as I fondly called her, would sing to me, even dance for me, especially at night when the moon was out. Ma usually sat behind us, watching excitement move over the lines of our faces. As I grew, I noticed the permanent sadness written all over Ma’s visage and existence. She was not a happy woman at all. Seeing my aunt become that successful city woman which my mother was not stirred in me questions about what happened when they were growing up. (p. 21)

Passage B

That evening Adeoye visited the village clinic. A rusty signpost outside the building had inscribed on it, Obade clinic. It was not much of a place. In fact, his uncle’s office was a small cubicle carved out of the waiting room. He had insisted when he was newly posted that having his chair where patients were to be treated, a chair where there could see him diagnose another patient, was not professional at all. The office had thus been carved out with wood as demarcation for the waiting room in an angle close to the window. The small room allowed a thin table and three chairs, one for the doctor and the other two for the patients. A couch lay close to the wall allowing for just an individual space from the chair of the patient to the bed. It was on the bed that he normally examined his patients. Two bowls of water that Root and Stem normally replaced at intervals were on the right, a makeshift for the hand washing sink. Adeoye scanned through and noticed that at least there was a credge, the first-aid box, sphygmomanometer and a diagnostic set. The rest of the clinic was not so spectacular and quite unlike what Adeoye had expected. The waiting room was moderate with some old benches. The floor was a roughly finished concrete floor, just a little application of cement would have made it perfect, but hygiene was most important, as the cleaner woman ensured that she did hourly mopping to check the steady dust. The clinic had three wards, one for males which was large enough to occupy four hospital beds. The second ward for females looked the same, whilst the third ward was the maternity-cum-operating room.

The clinic lacked so many things and was obviously underfunded since the villagers could only afford little after forcing themselves to come. Most of them only came when all local concoctions had failed to work and death starred as the next reality. In such cases, Kayode complained about the illiteracy and ignorance of the people, who, in trying to dodge medical fees, put their lives at risks, at the mercy of local drugs that had no dosage. Some people could not pay the hospital bills; this Kayode was aware of. He then permitted paying in instalments, knowing full well that the demand for the immediate full payment will send many of them away. All these he told Adeoye in his office. The young boy looked at his uncle. What possibly could his father intend him to learn there (p. 74-76).

 

 

Passage C

The times had changed and it became paramount for Bayo to engage Enitan in a series of discussions about his sister. He saw her in the house all the time after school, sharing side smiles and watching Oreofe’s childish instincts. He did not hide the fact that he felt left out. It seemed the whole world around the house revolved round his sister. The little baby had grown so accustomed to Dayo that he practically disallowed any other person the bliss of feeling the warmth of his body in their arms. He taught it had been his sister’s plan all along to make him feel that, when it came to their youngest brother, she was in charge; that, at least, the young one would love her and her alone.

It was basically heavenly that there were not identical, even in the very least of ways. Dayo had so many things and even the very one Bayo ever wished for. Enitan. He wished she could be his friend. Enitan was the only person he hoped he could win to his side. There was no need for the feel of love gone lost between his sister and him. It never existed. The only way he could get Enitan to follow him after school as she made her way to her house. Enitan had made Dayo’s house a second home. She saw it as an opportunity to know who Dayo’s twin really was (p112).

Passage D

The sun shone brightly into the room with sublime fluorescence. Adeoye’s eyes opened, slowly at first. The sun rays penetrating into his eyes were too bright initially, which made him close his eyes, relax a bit and then opened them again. His eyes blinked for some time until they were wide open. A figure was before him, a white figure that he had missed in his conscious state for some time. The figure was making gestures at him, pointing so many fingers, reshaping them in their positions until his auditory nerves came alive and he could hear Angela’s boisterous voice.

“And he is awake at last! Welcome to planet earth. How was your journey? Hope you fastened your seat belts? She said at all once. Adeoye began to understand it all, all that had looked like a deluge of mirage encounters. Angela was sitting on the bed, her small weight pressing on the foam, creating a wedge on the side he sat on.

“Aunty Angela,” Adeoye called in a voice that betrayed him. The voice was too thin and weak to be his voice. Whatever happened to his thick masculine voice? His eyes roamed, placing recognition on everything in the room. It looked the same, just the way he last remembered seeing it except for some fresh flowers on the table which had been replaced. His hands moved over to his neck; something was pushing into his neck, though subtly. When Angela saw this great effort he was making to remove the thing around his neck, she helped him. It turned out to be Simone, Angela’s gift to Adeoye on his first day in Obade. He frowned (p136).

Passage E

A spasm escaped Enitan as she nodded intermittently with her sniffing nose. She wanted to tell her aunt she would do it for her, and also admittedly to make her mother proud. Enitan saw in her aunt again the woman she always adorned, who loved her. The question of the visitor in her home roved round Enitan who directly wanted to ask about the relationship he shared with her. She tried to force the words out of her numbed mouth which had grown slack owing to the tears. However, no words came out.

The rest of the day went on with no eventful activity. Enitan covered her shame in the confines of her room. She could not go out of the room after the outburst in the morning before her aunt’s special visitor. She tried as much as possible to avoid him throughout the day. When she was sure he was in her aunt’s room, she stealthily walked out to eat. Then she disappeared into her room and began running her eyes through old newspapers she newly noticed, stacked on the topmost part of the wardrobe. She flipped through a lot of them, leaning on the wardrobe. She flipped through a lot of them, learning on the knowledge history harboured, matters of the past that shaped the present, matters that meant much to those who knew about them, matters about her country. When the world was bothered about governance, climate and science, the only things that occurred to them in the village was how to live each day to follow the rites of passage. Her assurance that she could try again became boosted by the stories she read in the newspapers. She flipped through repeatedly, even though she only read snatches of articles and gasped at pictures of great icons and personalities. This novel assurance gave vent to her seeing school more like a challenge than an ordeal. In the evening, she felt that compelling need to leave her room. A step or two away she heard great moaning from her aunt’s room. Enitan guessed what it meant. She retraced her steps to her room and tried not to think about it. It was not until she got to her room that she realised she had not turned but walked backwards. Not that she didn’t know it will happen between two adults who were attracted to each other, but the very proof, singing through her ear drums, confirmed the reality he tried to stash. She did not sleep much throughout the night, with so many innocuous turnovers caused by dreadful nightmares of her aunt, naked in the embraced arm of her special visitor. (Page 178-179)

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Practice Exercises

1a. Identify the base of the following words..

  1. Existence  ii. Unanswered  iii. Complicated  iv. Relations v. Underfunded vi. instalments

1b. What is the stems of the words above?

 2a . Using the first paragraph in Passage D, identify two words whose roots are the same as the stem

2b. In not more than two sentences, what is the difference between a root and a stem.

2c. Give two examples each from any of the passages

3a. how many morphemes are in the following words

  1. grew ii. Answers iii. Infancy iv. Was v. Popular

3b. Write out the free morphemes and bound morphemes in the words above

  1. Using the words ‘Successful’ and ‘Growing’ as your reference point, differentiate between inflectional and derivational morphemes.
  2. Write out all the words with derivational morphemes in Passage A above.
  3. There are three words with in the third line of the second paragraph of Passage A. Identify them.
  4. Using the words ‘visit’ and ‘sadness’ as your reference point, differentiate between free and bound morphemes.
  5. How many clauses are in the sentences below:
  6. Auntie, as I fondly call her, would sing to me, even dance for me especially at night when the moon was out.
  7. The Clinic lacked so many things and was obviously underfunded since the villagers could only afford little after forcing themselves to come.

iii. She flipped through a lot of them, learning on the knowledge history harboured, matters of the past that shaped the present, matters that meant much to those who knew about them, matters about her country.

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  1. Analyse the following sentences into their structural patterns,
  2. When the world was bothered about governance, climate and science, the only things that occurred to them in the village was how to live each day to follow the rites of assage (Passage E)
  3. The rest of the day went on with no eventful activity.

iii. Enitan guessed what it meant

  1. Enitan covered her shame in the confines of her room.
  2. As I grew, I noticed the permanent sadness written all over Ma’s visage and existence.
  3. When Angela saw this great effort he was making to remove the thing around his neck, she helped him.
  4. ‘…which had grown slack owing to the tears’
  5. what is the grammatical name of the clause above?
  6. what is its function in the sentence?
  7. ‘She retraced her steps to her room and tried not to think about it.’

 State the number of clauses in the sentence above and name each of them

12a. What is main clause in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Passage E?

  1. What is the grammatical name of the subordinate clause in the sentence?
  2. What is the subject of the third sentence in paragraph one of Passage E?
  3. Write out the verbal group in the second sentence of the second paragraph of Passage E
  4. How many clauses are in the sentence from Passage E below?
  5. What type of verbs do you have in basic simple sentence pattern 1 and 4
  6. Give an instance of basic simple sentence pattern 1 from passage D.
  7. What type of adverb is “frequently” as used in Passage A?

19a. How many clauses are in the first paragraph of passage D?

  1. Identify them from the passage.
  2. Give two instances of adverbial clauses from the passage.
  3. What type of sentence is ‘I had a hardworking mother, but answers to the questions about my father had remained a mystery’?
  4. Identify two verbal groups from Passage C with a modal auxiliary verb and a lexical verb.
  5. Give an instance of a phrasal verb from passage B.
  6. What Type of nominal group is in the group: ‘In the house’
  7. Write out four examples of prepositional group from paragraph one of Passage C.
  8. Identify an adverbial group from sentence one of paragraph two in Passage C
  9. Write out four examples of ‘H’ type nominal group realised by a pronoun from passage C.
  10. Write out an ‘MHQ’ nominal group in the first sentence of the first paragraph of Passage D.
  11. ‘… the sun rays’ what type of nominal group is this?
  12. Write out five examples of ‘MH’ nominal group from the passage above.
  13. Identify from any of the passages:
  14. an ‘H’ type realised by a noun without modifier (s) and qualifier (s)
  15. two ‘MH’ types each from passage D and E functioning at the subject level.
  16. Identify from passage C a noun headed nominal group functioning at the subject level
  17. State the word formation processes used in each of the words culled from Passage B
  18. hourly ii. Signpost iii. Demarcation iv. Hand washing v. Normally vi. Childish vii. Illiteracy viii. Underfundedix. Reality  x. Professional.
  19. Identify the compound words in Passage E
  20. ECOWAS is an instance of _________ word formation process
  21. Negative prefixes can be used in place of ‘not’. True or False

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